The 5 Most Effective Ways to Consolidate Credit Card Debt

Dealing with credit card debt can be overwhelming. If you’re having trouble making your payments, consolidating your credit card debt may be an effective solution to your problems. The best way to consolidate credit card…

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How to Escape Debt in 2016

How to Escape Debt in 2016

The new year is right around the corner and if you’re like most people, you’ve probably got a running list of resolutions to achieve and milestones to reach. If getting out of debt ranks near the top, now’s the time to starting thinking about how you’re going to hit your goal. Developing a clear-cut action plan can get you that much closer to debt-free status in 2016.

1. Add up Your Debt

You can’t start attacking your debt until you know exactly how much you owe. The first step to paying down your debt is sitting down with all of your statements and adding up every penny that’s still outstanding. Once you know how deep in debt you are, you can move on to the next step.

2. Review Your Budget

A budget is a plan that sets limits on how you spend your money. If you don’t have one, it’s a good idea to put a budget together as soon as possible. If you do have a budget, you can go over it line by line to find costs you can cut out. By eliminating fees and unnecessary expenses like cable subscriptions, you’ll be able to use the money you save to pay off your debt.

3. Set Your Goals

How to Escape Debt in 2016

At this point in the process, you should have two numbers: the total amount of money you owe and the amount you can put toward your debt payments each month. Using those two figures, you should be able determine how long it’s going to take you to pay off your mortgage, student loans, personal loans and credit card debt.

Let’s say you owe your credit card issuer $25,000. If you have $500 in your budget that you can use to pay off that debt each month, you’ll be able to knock $6,000 off your card balance in a year. Keep in mind, however, that you’ll still need to factor in interest to get an accurate idea of how the balance will shrink from one year to the next.

4. Lower Your Interest Rates

Interest is a major obstacle when you’re trying to get out of debt. If you want to speed up the payment process, you can look for ways to shave down your rates. If you have high-interest credit card debt, for instance, transferring the balances to a card with a 0% promotional period can save you some money and reduce the amount of time it’ll take to get rid of your debt.

Refinancing might be worth considering if you have student loans, car loans or a mortgage. Just remember that completing a balance transfer or refinancing your debt isn’t necessarily free. Credit card companies typically charge a 3% fee for balance transfers and if you’re taking out a refinance loan, you might be on the hook for origination fees and other closing costs.

5. Increase Your Income

How to Escape Debt in 2016

Keeping a tight rein on your budget can go a long way. But that’s not the only way to escape debt. Pumping up your paycheck in the new year can also help you pay off your loans and increase your disposable income.

Asking your boss for a raise will directly increase your earnings, but there’s no guarantee that your supervisor will agree to your request. If you’re paid by the hour, you can always take on more hours at your current job. And if all else fails, you can start a side gig to bring in more money.

Hold Yourself Accountable

Having a plan to get out of debt in the new year won’t get you very far if you’re not 100% committed. Checking your progress regularly is a must, as is reviewing your budget and goals to make sure you’re staying on track.

Photo credit: Â©iStock.com/BsWei, ©iStock.com/marekuliasz, ©iStock.com/DragonImages

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Late Payments, Credit Scores and Credit Reports

A missed credit card or loan payment can have a seriously detrimental effect on your credit report. The golden rule of using a credit card is to make your payments on time every time, building a respectable payment history, avoiding debt, and keeping your creditor happy.

But what happens when you fall behind with your monthly payments; what happens when you miss a single loan or credit card payment as a result of a mistake, an oversight or a lack of funds? How will your creditor react, how quickly will the credit reporting agencies find out, and what options do you have for getting back on your feet?

How Late Payments Affect Your Credit Score

A late payment can reduce your credit score significantly and remain on your report for 7 years. It won’t impact your score throughout that time and the longer you leave it, the less of an impact it will have. However, the impact could be significant for individuals with good credit and bad credit.

As an example, if you have a credit score of 750 to 800, which is towards the upper end, a late payment could knock up to 710 points from your score. More importantly, it will remain on your payment history for years to come and reduce your chances of getting everything from a student loan to a credit card and mortgage.

How Soon do Late Payments Show on Credit Reports

You won’t be hit with a derogatory mark as soon as you miss a credit card payment. The credit card issuer may charge you a fee, but by law, they are not allowed to market it as a missed payment until it is 30 days due. And this doesn’t just apply to credit card debt, it’s true for loans as well.

Providing you cover the payment within 30-days, you can avoid a missed payment mark appearing on your credit report. But as soon as that period passes, your lender will inform the major credit bureaus and your score will take a hit.

Some lenders wait even longer before reporting, so you may have as long as 60 days to make that payment. Check with your creditor to see when they start reporting missed payments.

What About Partial Payments?

Many lenders treat a partial payment the same as a missed payment, especially where credit cards are concerned. If you’re struggling to meet your payment obligations, contact your creditor in advance, tell them how desperate your situation is and inform them that you can meet part of the payment.

They may offer you some reprieve, they may not, but you won’t know if you don’t ask. However, it’s worth noting that this will only impact your score if you don’t cover the remaining credit card payment before the 30-day period is up.

To avoid confusion, we should also mention that this only applies to the minimum payment. Some credit card users get confused with the difference between a balance and a minimum payment.

Simply put, the balance is what you clear at the end of the month to avoid accumulating debt and paying interest. If you fail to pay that balance on time, your debt will simply roll over to the next month, after which you will be required to meet a minimum payment on your debt. If, however, you miss that minimum payment, then you’re at risk of your credit report taking a hit.

Reporting agencies don’t record the difference between a rolling balance and a debt. If you spend $3,000 on your card every month but pay it off without fail and without delay, you won’t accumulate interest and technically, you won’t have debt. However, at the end of the month, the reporting agencies will show that you owe $3,000 on that card, just as they would show if you had accumulated a balance of $1,000 a month for three months and let it rollover.

How Long Does a Late Payment Stay?

A late payment will remain on your credit report for 7 years. But herein lies another confusion. Just because it reduces your score by 100 points and remains for 7 years doesn’t mean you will suffer a reduction of 100 points for those 7 years. 

It generally stops having a major impact on your score after a couple of years and while it will still have an impact in that 7-year period, it will be infinitesimal by the time you reach the end.

How Many Late Payments Can You Make Before it Reduces Your Score?

One late credit card payment is all it takes to reduce your score, providing that late payment was delayed by at least 30-days. However, that doesn’t mean you can forget about it once the 30-day period has passed and it definitely doesn’t mean that all the possible damage has been done.

It can and will get worse if you continue to avoid that payment. Your credit report will show how late the payment is in 30-day installments. When it reached 180 days, your account will enter default and may be charged-off, which will reduce your score and your chances of acquiring future credit even more.

Your creditor may sell your account to a collection agency. If this happens, the agency will chase you for repayment, seeking to establish a repayment plan or to request a settlement. Accounts are often in this stage when a consumer goes through debt settlement, as creditors and debt collectors are typically more susceptible to accepting reduced settlements because the debt has all but been written off.

How to Remove Late Payments from Your Credit Report

Although rare, it is possible to remove late payments from your credit report. There are also numerous ways you can reverse late payment fees, and we recommend trying these whenever you can as it will save you a few bucks.

Here are a few options to remove late payments and late payment fees:

Use Your Respectable History

The quickest way to get what you want is to ask for it. If you have a clean credit history and have made your payments on time in the past, you can request that the fee/mark be removed. 

Write them a letter requesting forgiveness, explain that it was an oversight or a temporary issue and point to your record as proof that this will likely not happen again. Creditors may seem like heartless corporations, but real humans make their decisions for them and, like all companies, they have to put their customers first.

Request Automatic Payments

Lenders have been known to remove late payment fees if the debtor signs up for automatic payments. It makes their job easier as it prevents issues in the future and ensures they get what they are owed, so it’s something they actively promote.

They may make this offer themselves, but if not, contact them and ask them if there is anything you can do to remove the late payment. They should bring this up; if they don’t, you can. It doesn’t hurt to ask and the worse they can do is say no.

Claim Difficulties

If you claim financial difficulties or hardships and make it clear that a late payment will make those difficulties much worse, the lender may be willing to help. Contrary to what you might think, their goal is not to make life difficult for you and to destroy you financially. 

It’s important to see things from their perspective. If you borrow $15,000 and your balance climbs to $20,000 with interest, their main goal is to get that $15,000 back, after which everything else is profit. If you pay $10,000 and start slipping-up, the risk of default will increase. The worse your financial situation becomes, the higher that risk will be. 

If they eventually sell the account to a debt collector, that remaining $10,000 could earn them just a couple of hundred dollars, which means they will lose a substantial sum of money. They are generally willing to help any way they can if doing so will increase their profits.

How to Avoid Late Payments

A late payment can do some serious damage to your payment history so the best thing to do is to prevent it from occurring in the first place. It’s a no-brainer, but this is a common issue and it’s one that countless consumers have every single year. So, keep your credit card and loan payments stable with these tips.

Set Automatic Payments

Occasionally, consumers forget to pay. Life is hectic, they have a lot of responsibilities to juggle, and it’s easy for them to overlook a single payment. If this happens, it should be caught and fixed before the 30-day period ends and the credit bureaus find out. But even then, fees can accumulate, and problems escalate.

To avoid this, set up automatic payments so your minimum payment is paid in full every month. You can do this for all debt, including student loan payments. Just make sure you have the money in your account to meet this minimum charge, otherwise, you could be paying for debt on one account by accumulating it on another.

Set a Budget

A credit card is designed to encourage you to spend money you don’t have. You’re buying things you can’t afford now in the hope or expectation that you will cover them later, only to realize that you’re struggling so much you can’t even cover the minimum payment.

If you ever find yourself in a situation like this, it’s time to analyze your finances and create a sensible budget. You may feel like you have a good idea of what you’re spending each month and how this compares to your gross income, but the vast majority of consumers seriously underestimate their expenses.

Improve Your Credit by Fixing Your Debt-to-Income Ratio

Calculate your debt to income ratio by comparing your total debt (credit card payments, student loans) to your gross income. The higher this is, the harder you need to work, and the less you need to spend on your credit card. 

Your debt to income ratio should be your central focus when seeking to improve your credit score, because while it’s not considered for loan and credit card applications, it does play a role in mortgage applications and is important for calculating affordability.

Conclusion: It’s Not the End of the World

A late payment can strike a disastrous blow to your credit report, but it’s not the end of the world and you do have a few options at your disposal. Not only do you have up to 30 (and sometimes 60) days to make the payment and prevent a derogatory market, but you can file a claim to have it removed in the event that it does appear.

And if none of that works, a little credit repair can get you back on track. Just keep making those payments every month, talk with your lender when you find yourself in trouble, and remember that nothing is unfixable where credit is concerned.

Late Payments, Credit Scores and Credit Reports is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Annual Fee Refund Credits on Chase Hyatt Legacy Cards

Multiple readers reached out about annual fee refund credits on their Hyatt card (legacy version). A lot of people are confused by this credit or thinking that it’s part of a pandemic credit program, but it seems to be related to the conversion that took place on January 11 of the legacy Hyatt card to the World of Hyatt card. Chase is apparently prorating the annual fee, and then presumably a new annual fee will post soon to the card, perhaps on February 1.

Hat tip to readers Mike S and B.

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Understanding the Perk of a Credit Card Extended Warranty

Many manufacturers warranty their products against defects or certain other issues for a period of time. This is known as the manufacturer’s limited warranty, and depending on the product, it might provide coverage for a period as short as 30 days or as long as three or more years. In many cases, by swiping the right piece of plastic at checkout, you can get an automatic credit card extended warranty.

What Is Extended Warranty Coverage?

An extended warranty is any coverage that goes beyond what the manufacturer provides automatically when you buy a product. Extended warranties are often available for purchase from third parties.

For example, you might purchase an appliance at a home-improvement store like Home Depot or a piece of electronics at a big-box store such as Best Buy. When you pay, you might be asked if you want to purchase extra warranty coverage of several years beyond the manufacturer warranty. In some cases, these warranties step in to provide additional coverage, such as replacing the product if it is damaged or falls victim to typical wear and tear.

What is a Credit Card Extended Warranty?

Some credit card accounts come with a special perk. If you purchase a qualifying product with your card, the card network backs your purchase with an extended warranty coverage. The extended warranty coverage that comes with some of the best credit cards usually extends the manufacturer’s warranty for up to a year longer.

The length of an extended warranty offered can vary by card, and the credit card network won’t extend a warranty past a certain time. Typically, if the manufacturer offers more than a five-year limited warranty, no card network adds time to that. Some only add time if the manufacturer’s warranty is three years or less. Others only add to a manufacturer’s warranty that ends within 12 months.

How Can You Tell if Your Credit Card Includes Extended Warranty Protection?

Many major cards, including some on Visa, American Express and MasterCard networks, offer warranty protection. The best way to find out if your credit card company includes this perk is to read your benefits guide, which is included in the paperwork that came with your card. You can also usually find this information online if you have an online account for the card or you can call the customer service number for your credit card issuer and ask.

Does My Visa Card Have an Extend Warranty?

If your card is a Visa Signature card, then this extra perk is included. Simply look for the words Visa Signature on the front of your card. If you don’t see those words, consult your benefits paperwork or call customer service to get the details about card benefits.

Does Capital One Offer Extended Warranty?

Yes, some Capital One cards come with extended warranty protection. This is because Capital One cards are typically issued on either the Visa or MasterCard network, and it’s the network that provides the warranty coverage.

Does the Costco Visa Include Extended Warranty Perks?

Yes, someCostco-branded Visa credit cards include an extended warranty perk. This is also true for several other branded cards for various stores, hotel chains or airlines.

How Does the Visa (or Other) Extended Warranty Work?

Credit card extended warranty programs have some unique guidelines but do tend to follow the same overall concept. You pay for an eligible item with your credit card. If a covered issue arises after the manufacturer’s warranty coverage is up but before the extended time period covered by the card network, then you can file a claim to be reimbursed for the loss. To file a claim, you’ll need to call the benefits administrator for your credit card issuer.

  • American Express: 1-800-225-3750
  • Visa: 1-800-882-8057
  • MasterCard: 1-800-622-7747

When you make a purchase with your credit card, keep the receipt in case you need to file a claim. Also keep the manufacturer’s warranty, receipt, serial number and product description information on hand. You’ll need all of this information when you make the phone call to file a claim.

Make it a habit to start a paper file whenever you spend big on something. That way, you’ll be ready in case you need to use this benefit. But do note that not all purchases are covered by these rewards. Examples of what’s not covered include boats, motorized vehicles, computer software and used or pre-owned items.

Extra Protection by Paying with Credit Cards

The credit card extended warranty isn’t the only perk you might get when you pay with your credit card. Some cards offer buyer’s remorse protection, ensuring you can always return eligible items within certain windows, or travel and road protections for peace of mind when you find yourself 100 miles or more away from home.

Understanding how credit cards work and what benefits you get from yours lets you get added value when making purchases. Start off right by choosing the best credit card for your needs and using it wisely as one resource in your personal money management toolbox.

The post Understanding the Perk of a Credit Card Extended Warranty appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

Best credit cards for international travel

The best credit cards for international travel can make traveling a more comfortable and rewarding experience, and in more ways than one.

The right rewards credit card can help you score valuable travel perks like airport lounge access and expedited airport security. Some cards even let you avoid unnecessary foreign transaction fees. The top travel cards in the market also let you earn points and miles you can redeem for free flights, hotel stays and more.

If you’re in the market for a credit card for international travel, you’ll want to compare all the top cards to see how they might work for your travel style and goals. Keep reading to learn about the best credit cards for travel overseas, what they offer in terms of perks and rewards and how you can sign up.

Chase Sapphire Reserve®

  • Best for lounge access: The Platinum Card® from American Express
  • Best for flexibility: Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card
  • Best for infrequent international trips: Chase Sapphire Preferred® card*
  • Best with no annual fee: Bank of America® Travel Rewards credit card
  • Students: Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students*
  • Chase Sapphire Reserve: Best credit card for international travel

    The Chase Sapphire Reserve is frequently listed as the top travel credit card on the market today, and for good reason. This card gives you 3X points on travel and dining purchases plus 1 point per $1 on everything else you buy. Through March 2022, you will also earn 10 points each dollar you spend on rides with Lyft. As an added bonus, you will earn 3X points on up to $1,000 per month in grocery spending through April 30, 2021 as well.

    New cardholders are also eligible to earn 50,000 points after spending $4,000 within three months of account opening. That’s worth $750 in travel through the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal.

    Redemption options are very flexible: You can redeem rewards as statement credits toward any travel purchase, or for travel through the Chase portal to get a 50% redemption bonus (making your points worth 1.5 cents apiece). Also, you can transfer your points at a 1:1 rate to 11 travel partners, including United MileagePlus and Southwest Rapid Rewards.

    In exchange for the $550 annual fee, you’ll also receive excellent travel benefits like a TSA Precheck or Global Entry credit and a Priority Pass Select airport lounge membership. Furthermore, the card comes with some of the best travel protections around, including trip cancellation and interruption insurance and primary car rental insurance.

    The card also offers a $300 annual travel credit that applies to most travel purchases. So, if you make at least $300 in travel purchases each year, you’ll cancel out most of the card’s fee.

    if you do the math, you’ll find that the Sapphire Reserve is usually the better value if you travel often, despite its higher fee.